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It Takes Longer To Boil A Kettle Than Watch All The Words Spoken By People Of Colour In A Movie

We have a problem with diversity in film -- you only need to take a quick look at the posters in any cinema to see that.

If you’re not a white guy, you have to look pretty hard to find someone that resembles you playing the lead in a major Hollywood film. Luckily these days we have a few ways of measuring the diversity in cinema.

First there was the Bechdel Test, which draws attention to gender inequality in films, and now there’s this: Every Single Word Spoken by a Person of Color in [Mainstream Film Title]

Creator Dylan Marron (not the wine drinking, cigarette smoking Dylan Moran, this Dylan stars in Welcome To Night Vale) takes films and gives them a new cut, removing all the bits with white people.

The results are… brief. Try this re-edit of (500) Days Of Summer on for size:

You laughed right? And then you felt super bad for laughing?

Let’s just relive that for a second:

“okay, okay.”
“Tom, Mr Vance would like to see you in his office.”
“We’ve been stuck on this for an hour.”
“Son, you’re gonna have to exit the vehicle.”
“I now pronounce you husband and wife. You may kiss the bride.”

THAT’S IT. 41 words in a 95 minute movie. That’s less than a word every two minutes. And apparently the only way you can get a speaking part as a person of colour is by playing someone in a service industry.  

Did The Fault In Our Stars make you cry the first time? Well get ready to absolutely weep at this 41 second version:

Or how about Noah, which manages to have a grand total of ZERO WORDS spoken by people of colour:

ARE YOU TRYING TO TELL ME THERE ARE NO PEOPLE OF COLOUR IN THE BOOK OF GENESIS?

And it’s not just that people of colour aren’t being cast in movies. Filmmakers are going as far as actually rewriting history rather than casting them, like in the case of upcoming gay rights film Stonewall. Unsurprisingly, people are peeved:

 

Let’s try and have some better standards in future, okay everyone?

 

Casey BriggsComment